FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS:

1. How much do I have to pay before my order starts?

2. What happens if I need to cancel my order?
3. What happens if I there is something wrong with my CDs or my printing?
4. How much music can I put on my CD?
5. What do I have to do to get distributed on www.morphius.com?
6. Is it cheaper to do a shorter CD?
7. What is the maximum length for a business card CD-ROM or Custom Shaped CD?
8. How will my printing be done on my CDs?
9. How will my printing be done on my CD-Rs?
10. How will my printing for my inserts be done?
11. How is printing of short-run CDs inserts done (quantities under 300 or 500)?
12. How do I set up colors for my inserts?
13. How do I set up colors for the art to be printed directly on my CDs?

1. How much do I have to pay before my order starts? (back to top)
Normally, new customers are required to place a 75% deposit on all orders. If you prefer, you may prepay for your entire order. The remainder of your balance shall be due prior to either shipment from our plant facilities or prior to pickup from our Corporate offices.

2. What happens if I need to cancel my order? (back to top)
We give you a refund for any money that you have been charged that we haven’t produced that service for as of the time that you cancel. In the industry the technical description of this policy is "all unused monies will be returned." Please note that any services and items that have been completed, including design work completed, film output, direct-to-plate processing, and any elements transfer fees normally included in the cost of replication (normally $23) , will still be invoiced if completed (whether or not it is an item that you can use once the order has been cancelled).

3. What happens if I there is something wrong with my CDs or my printing? (back to top)
Our official policy states that if there is a mechanical defect with your CDs or printing, or if your printing is not "acceptable to within industry standards", then we will promptly replace it. While custom manufactured items are not refundable for a cash refund, if there is anything wrong with your replicated and printed product, we will take the steps to fix it. Note that this does not included things that might have gone wrong on your end before you sent us the elements for duplication, so please be careful when you are preparing your masters and artwork.

4. How much music can I put on my CD? (back to top)
The maximum time that is guaranteed on the production of CDs is 78 minutes (78:00:00), however there are some older CD players that will not allow a CD of that length to play correctly. Note that there are currently two CD-R sizes: 650 Megabytes and 700 Megabytes. If you intend to put more than 74 minutes of music on your CDs, you will need to use a 700MB blank for your master. Be careful when creating your program, though, as the 700MB CD-R will actually allow you to make an 80 minute program (which will not replicate accurately onto an actual CD).

5. What do I have to do to get distributed on www.morphius.com? (back to top)
We give all our customers the opportunity to distribute their music, including a free barcode for their CDs, and free distribution on our website. We can also help you to distribute your music to stores and sell it on other websites, such as Amazon.com and the iTunes music store. Speak to your customer service representative about this great opportunity.

6. Is it cheaper to do a shorter CD? (back to top)
Although the duplication prices for our magnetic-based mediums like VHS tapes and cassettes are based on length of the cassette, CDs are made using a different process that does not vary in price based on length.

7. What is the maximum length for a business card CD-ROM or Custom Shaped CD? (back to top)
The maximum lengths for business card CDs and specialty shaped CDs vary based on the shape selected. Each of our specialty products has a maximum size listed next to it in our custom products section. If you will be creating your own shape for a CD and submitting it to us, the maximum amount of music/information you can put on the CD will be determined after we have received your shape diagram and your order has been placed. We recommend that you review similar shapes to give yourself a rough idea of how much information will be able to be placed onto your proposed shape.

8. How will my printing be done on my CDs? (back to top)
Normally, the type of printing that we use to imprint on the actual surface of your CDs is a high definition silk-screening process. This varies slightly from offset printing, which is available for an additional fee. A significant portion of discs which contain high-end product demonstrations, consumer software, or video games are printed using offset printing, but most audio CDs and lower quantity (under 25000) runs of CD-ROM releases are printed using silkscreen printing. There are some limitations to the silkscreen method, as follows: The reproduction of realistic designs and photographs, as well as color transitions and gradients, will not look exactly the same as similar items which are printed using an offset process, so if your needs are very exacting, you may want to consider upgrading to using an offset printing on your CD surface. For technical information about these limitations, please review our section on silkscreen printing.

9. How will my printing be done on my CD-Rs? (back to top)
Normally, the type of printing that we use to imprint on the actual surface of a CD-R is a hybrid process which combines the economic savings of thermal printing with a high definition inkjet printing process. Normally, our customers select CD-R duplication and printing when they are either 1) ordering less than 250 units, or 2) in a big hurry for an order of 300-500 units. For an additional fee, we can print using a silkscreen process (or even an offset printing process for a much higher fee), but usually the cost of upgrading to silkscreen process are nearly the same as the cost to increase the order to 300 units and change the order to CDs instead of CD-Rs. So most of our customers just determine whether it is worth the extra cost to increase to our minimum CD quantity. If not, they utilize our economically sound & included inkjet printing method for their CD-R order.

10. How will my printing for my inserts be done? (back to top)
All printing of CD inserts in quantities of 500 units or higher is done using offset printing, and some orders between 300 and 499 units are offset printed as well. These print jobs are done primarily on large format presses with sophisticated coordinate control, so that the color matching for each individual print job can be done accurately. Certain larger booklet sizes and/or jobs with custom color configurations are printed on presses by themselves, with no other print jobs happening at the same time. Although we primarily use a new technologically sophisticated process called Direct-To-Plate printing which creates print-ready metal plates at 2540 dpi resolution and skipping the step of creating Lithographic Film Negatives (also just called "Films"), we still do accept customer supplied film for all print jobs, whether new print jobs or reorders of CDs previously printed with other companies. Because Direct-to-Plate printing is more economical than conventional printing, we recommend that most all of our customers submit their artwork on disc (or let us design it) and make use of this efficient method.

11. How is printing of short-run CDs inserts done (quantities under 300 or 500)? (back to top)
Orders under 300/500 units (depending on the booklet/folder size & type) are printed using laser printers specifically calibrated for CD insert printing and specially designed paper which makes it easy to complete the finish work for the print job once the designs have been printed on the paper. When we print lower quantities using Laser printing, we do not create a "plate" or use films. Instead, we print directly from your art files, which saves some money in setup costs. Note that the resolution of inserts printed using laser printers (600 dpi continuous tone) is somewhat lower than that of our offset printing. This difference tends to create a somewhat different final look for the inserts, but still satisfactory for most of our customers needs.

12. How do I set up colors for my inserts? (back to top)
On most all of our print jobs for inserts, we use what is called CMYK printing. Regardless of the program you are using to create your artwork, you will need to set the program to use CMYK color mode. This is easy with most professional design programs, as well as with layout programs such as QuarkXpress, Adobe Pagemaker, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Indesign, CorelDraw, Aldus Freehand, and others. Some other programs which are primarily designed for web applications will not allow you to set your color mode to CMYK. Normally, our design/prepress staff can make this change for you, but the colors shown in the final output of your inserts will vary somewhat from that which you either saw or printed using your original application.

13. How do I set up colors for the art to be printed directly on my CDs? (back to top)
When we do the silkscreen printing for the surface of your CDs, there are several significant differences in the printing method that are important to be aware of. They are as follows:1) because the surface of an unprinted compact disc is reflective silver, colors printed directly on this surface will look different from images that are printed directly on a white surface. To compensate for this difference, we generally print a white base (normally referred to as a white flood) before printing the image on the disc.2) in silkscreen printing, solid colors image better than colors which are built using a color separation process, so many designers choose to create art which utilizes more basic design concepts that make use of more solid colors than separated colors. To allow for these two basic preferences, we use two different printing modes for on-disc printing. The first is called spot color printing, and we use an internationally standardized color system called the Pantone Matching System (also referred to as PMS color printing). The other type of printing that we do is for full-color disc designs (CMYK printing), but in order to achieve reasonably good results, we nearly always print a white flood coat before we print the CMYK image on the disc. This helps the colors to be a reasonably good match for any similar images that are being used on accompanying inserts. We normally refer to this five color printing process as CMYK+W printing.In order to set up the image for on your disc surface, you will need to set the color mode to whichever of the above printing methods you wish to use (CMYK or PMS). While it is relatively easy to set your design work and monochromatic images to CMYK in most any design program (or convert any color pictures from RGB mode to CMYK mode if necessary), it is somewhat more difficult to convert from RGB to Pantone colors with most photo manipulation programs, such as Adobe Photoshop, CorelDraw, Adobe Indesign.If you are trying to create multi-spot color images, we recommend the use of a specialized layout program such as QuarkXpress, Adobe Pagemaker, Adobe Illustrator, or Aldus Freehand. If, on the other hand, you are trying to turn a full color image into a duotone or tritone or monotone, you will first need to make these conversions in a program such as Adobe Photoshop, CorelDraw, or Adobe Indesign, and then you will need to import them into one of the other programs above.